Services for our disabled users

The library provides a range of services for disabled and dyslexic members and tries wherever possible to be responsive to your needs. We use the social model of disability to provide equality of access by removing social and physical barriers to resources.

How the library can help

  • One-to-one follow-up library induction (by pre-arrangement only – contact the library to make a booking)
  • One-to-one follow-up literature search and database training (by pre-arrangement only – contact the library to make a booking)
  • Assistance from friendly and knowledegable staff.
  • Cheaper photocopying (please ensure you retain your receipts if you wish to claim money back from your local authority).
  • Copying/printing on coloured paper for dyslexic/visually impaired users.
  • Dedicated workstations for visually-impaired and wheelchair users.
  • Postal loans and extended loan periods.
  • Special reservation service – most items can be reserved via the online catalogue, however if you require additional assistance, please contact us at least two working days in advance with details of the items you require
  • Microsoft accessibility application on all library PCs. Please ask for help at the library reception desk.
  • Readings in Braille or other alternative formats (by pre-arrangement only – please contact the library at least one month in advance).

Disability support from library staff

For enquiries about one to one training in the use of library resources please email Mathieu Lubrun the Information Skills Trainer. For other help and support email the Disability Support Team.

If you’d like library support and did not complete a Library Disability & Dyslexia Support Form as part of your registration, download a support form then complete it and email it to the library. We’ll then contact you to discuss how we can help you with your learning.

All information will be treated in the strictest confidence.

Computers and mobile devices

Microsoft Windows 10

Windows 10 offers a set of built-in and third-party accessibility features. Microsoft also offers tips for using its accessibility tools and features in its products to meet specific needs. Explore and download the Microsoft accessibility guides.

Apple Mac OS

Mac OS includes features to help you work in alternative ways including keyboard customisation, screen motion-reduction and Switch Control for assistive devices.

Apple iPhone and Apple iPad

Apple mobile devices have built-in settings that include voice control and display changes. From your device’s Home screen, go to Settings and find Accessibility.

Google Android devices

Google Android mobile devices include audio, vision and mobility support. On your device’s Settings app, tap Accessibility to find features.

Assistive audio

Find out how to listen to book chapters and articles from the library collection.

Audio Books

The Librivox Project is a growing a collection of audio books in the public domain read by volunteers, which can be preferable to an automated voice. Books are mainly fiction but there is also some Freud and psychology related material. opens in a new windowGet more information on Librivox.

Descriptive audio app

Seeing AI is an app that helps you navigate your day with the help of narration describing people, text and objects. Get more information on the Seeing AI App.

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