Copyright and Moodle

This guide is intended to help you keep within copyright law whilst making the most of Moodle.  Please be aware that copyright law varies according to purpose.  Use of Moodle for higher education teaching activities differs from the use of Moodle for NHS clinical and research work.  This protocol covers the use of Moodle for HE educational purposes.  If you are both a tutor and a clinician, please take time to also familiarise yourself with the protocol relating to the use of Moodle for NHS purposes to ensure you are using Moodle appropriately.

Tutors are encouraged by the Trust to use Moodle as a communication and teaching resource, however there are restrictions in the use of copyrighted materials.  The following is a brief guide to what can and can’t be uploaded.

 

Material that can be uploaded

  • Lecture notes, timetables, coursework cover sheets and instructions plus other course-related administrative information.
  • Extracts and articles of your own work providing you are the copyright holder, although it would be best practice to add these to course reading lists on Rebus whenever possible.(N.B. You are not automatically the copyrightholder just because you are the author of the article/extract, this depends on your agreement with the publisher.)
  • Presentations of your own work including slides and video as long as you are the copyright holder.  Following the 2014 changes to the CPDA 1988, Section 32, which relates to copying for the purposes of instruction,  tutors may now also use short extracts from films, sound recordings and broadcasts in their teaching.  This material can be shown on VLEs and interactive whiteboards.The principle of “fair dealing” applies to this usage which means only a small, highly relevant, proportion of a work may be used.The onus is on tutors to decide what constitutes a “fair” proportion, however it is advised that you only use brief clips and perhaps also restrict the time such material is available.As the term “fair” is open to different interpretations there could still be some legal risk so we suggest you use copyright free resources* or those created under Creative Commons Licences where possible.IMPORTANT:
    • Copying for the purposes of instruction relates to non-commercial copying only
    • Always accurately accredit the source
    • Check with the library if you are unsure about using this type of material
  •  Other people’s presentations provided written permission has been granted by the copyright holder, but be sure to check any additional materials (e.g. images, video clips) comply with “fair dealing” as outlined in point 3. above, unless you have written permission to use them from the copyrightholder.(NB even if the copyrightholder granted permission for the creator of the original presentation to use their material, it does not automatically mean this permission is extended to anyone else.)
  • Any materials that are out of copyright.  For more information about copyright periods check out the Helpful Copyright Information page at the end of this guidance.

 

Material that can not be uploaded

  • Articles/extracts from journals and books.  These must be requested via the library as part of an electronic reading list.  Please refer to the Electronic Reading List section for more details.  
  • Presentations of other peoples’ work unless you have written permission.  Please also be sure to check any additional materials (e.g. images, video clips) comply with “fair dealing” as outlined in point 3. above unless you have written permission to use them from the copyrightholder.(NB even if the copyrightholder granted permission for the creator of the original presentation to use their material, it does not automatically mean this permission is extended to anyone else.)

Always check with the library if you are unsure about copyright

Online Reading Lists

If you want to add digitised articles/extracts to your course page you will need to order these from the library as part of an electronic reading list.  Copyright restrictions apply.  For further details about electronic study packs please contact Helen Oliver holiver@tavi-port.ac.uk

Helpful Copyright Information

How long are works protected by copyright in the UK?

  • Literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works etc., and films are protected for 70 years following death of the author
  • Typographical arrangement of published works – are protected for 25 years from the end of the year of publication
  • Sound recordings – are protected for 50 years from the end of the year in which they were made, released or broadcast
  • Crown works are protected for 125 years
  • Databases – are protected for 15 years from the making
  • Unpublished works – if created after 1988 are protected for 70 years from the making.  If created before 1988 they are protected until 2039.

Websites offering copyright-free resources for educational use 

A word of caution first – please read the terms and conditions of use for each individual service carefully before downloading and using these resources. 

  • British Pathe News – 75 years of news footage.  Non-commercial educational use in UK only.  Further conditions apply. 
  • Find out how Creative Commons can allow you to share and re-use content legally.
  • Red Staf Fulfillment – free stock photo resources.
  • Free Technology for Teachers.
  • Image After. Online free image collection. 
  • Imperial War Museum Online. This collection offers access to material spanning all aspects of twentieth century conflict. There are over 3,000 images in the collection, including photographs, works of art, and sound files from the Sound Archive.Most of the material is protected by Crown Copyright and where it is not this will be made clear.  Crown Copyright material can be reproduced free of charge in any format for research, private study or for internal circulation within an educational organisation (such as schools, colleges and universities). This is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and not used in a misleading context.  When using the Crown Copyright items it is essential that the source of the material used is identified, the copyright status acknowledged and any picture reference numbers quoted (usually a two or three letter code followed by a series of numbers).
  • Newsfilm Online. This site offers access to television news content to users throughout UK higher education. 
  • Pics4Learning. Copyright friendly images for educational use.

More information about copyright

The Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust Library – If you are unsure about uploading materials on to Moodle or would just like more information about copyright generally the library is here to help. 

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